indypendenthistory:

Nancy Green a former slave, was employed in 1893 to promote the Aunt Jemima brand by demonstrating the pancake mix at expositions and fairs. She was a popular attraction because of her friendly personality, great story-telling, and warmth. Green signed a lifetime contract with the pancake company and her image was used for packaging and billboards.

indypendenthistory:

Nancy Green a former slave, was employed in 1893 to promote the Aunt Jemima brand by demonstrating the pancake mix at expositions and fairs. She was a popular attraction because of her friendly personality, great story-telling, and warmth. Green signed a lifetime contract with the pancake company and her image was used for packaging and billboards.

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

cisyphus:

Slurs are not oppressive because they are offensive, they are oppressive  because slurs by nature of being slurs draw upon certain power dynamics  to remind their target of his/her/their vulnerability in a certain relation to power and as an extension of that, to threaten violence and exploitation of that vulnerability.

(Source: uffie, via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

(Source: alltimeloe)

babefield:

mood

babefield:

mood

(Source: imvumous)

(Source: splintmail, via misandry-mermaid)

Anonymous said: I was raped by a chinese guy and now I'm worried I'm becoming racist. Whenever I see a chinese/asian person I have a panic attack and don't want them to come near me

selfcareafterrape:

Okay, I’ve elected to answer this because I think you’re in a precarious situation here. I’m answering the way that I am because you’ve identified that this is something you’re worried about.

There is a difference between contemplating whether feelings are invalid or valid and whether they are justified or unjustified. All feelings are valid. They are not all justified. Those that are not justified are the ones that we usually want to target for change.

In this case, your fear is completely valid and understandable. But it is not justified. The reason it’s not justified is because Asian men are no more likely to rape than men of any other race. You know this logically. Ways to work with this are plentiful, but the one I like to use the most when I have unjustified feelings is self-talk. You’re walking down the street and see an Asian man. You become afraid. Instead of following the fearful thoughts, you can counter them. “I am afraid right now, and this is understandable, but it is important to recognize that Asian men are not uniquely dangerous. This man beside me is not my rapist.” And the like. You don’t do this to go all “not all men” on yourself, but rather to teach yourself that it is possible to be safe again. It is possible to be safe among people who remind you of your rapist. But please remember, it’s okay to be where you are—especially is growing is a part of it. I’m still suicidal everyday, and that’s okay, because I’m working on a plan to not be. Get what I mean?

Additionally, it should be noted that this tends to occur in survivors that have been trained by parents, society, to have negative feelings toward another race already. This is not universally the case, and I certainly can’t confirm if that’s the case with you. But it’s very common.

Many survivors target anger at people who share the gender of the perpetrator, and this happens without the attachment of race, oftentimes, when the race of the perpetrator is the same (or supposedly similar) to the victim’s.

Internalized racism, socially conventional racism, stereotypes, all of it. We don’t get out of life without carrying some of this along with us. As adults, part of our responsible work is to unlearn these kinds of racism. And assault by a person of another race creates another dimension to this work and makes it extremely complicated. But it doesn’t make it impossible.

If this is what you’re experiencing (and it’s up to you to confirm or deny that), you can still do the work. The fact that you already have an awareness inside you that this could lead to problematic thoughts (and actions) is a good sign that you’re able to handle the work of unlearning.

The interesting thing about doing that work alongside the work of recovery is that it could have an effect on the feelings you have toward your perpetrator. I don’t mean that you’ll be suddenly thinking that he’s some kind of hero. I mean that he will gain more dimension and personhood. This is a good thing that comes with some bad things. During the process of gaining this new understanding, you’re probably going to have flashbacks. And they will probably be intense because you now have this living, breathing human being in your head. But the flashbacks can be managed. Your feelings can be managed. And you will get through it. Allowing everyone their full humanity, no matter how corrupted that humanity, is one of many ways to process and integrate your experience, and that is a really good thing.

A couple days ago, or a week ago, I said that reconnection is a part of recovery. I believe the work you’re about to engage in is about reconnection. Reconnection, in this case, refers to a global community of people who are all deserving of dignity. (Yes, I even afford my rapists dignity, but that is not what I mean.) I mean that the work of disconnecting your rapist’s actions from his race have the added benefit of allowing you to form connections with people outside your race without fear and without forcing them into a role in your head that is not just troubling for you, but incredibly unfair to them.

This is brave and important work. I’m sorry for what happened to you. And I wish you so much luck. Please take care and reach out if necessary.

-M

Rape tw
Racism tw

misandry-mermaid:

This series is BRILLANT.  And all made by the same woman.

meekfox:

getting an abortion does not make you a bad or selfish person. 

(via misandry-mermaid)

fandomsandfeminism:

xxtopamaxx:

Wtf?! How the hell does that work?! Dumb bitch

Did you consider googleing this to see what she was referring to? Because I wasn’t sure either, but sure enough, a quick google search found: 
Clime Change will affect women more severly than men

The report, Gender and Climate Change(available here as a PDF), concludes that women are more severely affected by climate change and natural disasters because of their social roles and because of discrimination and poverty. To make matters worse, they’re also underrepresented in decision-making about climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and, most critically, discussions and decisions about adaptation and mitigation. From the report:

For example, the 20,000 people who died in France during the extreme heat wave in Europe in 2003 included significantly more elderly women than men. In natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, both in developing and in developed countries, it is primarily the poor who have suffered—and all over the world, the majority of the poor are women, who at all levels earn less than men. In developing countries, women living in poverty bear a disproportionate burden of climate change consequences. Because of women’s marginalized status and dependence on local natural resources, their domestic burdens are increased, including additional work to fetch water, or to collect fuel and fodder. In some areas, climate change generates resource shortages and unreliable job markets, which lead to increased male-out migration and more women left behind with additional agricultural and households duties. Poor women’s lack of access to and control over natural resources, technologies and credit mean that they have fewer resources to cope with seasonal and episodic weather and natural disasters. Consequently traditional roles are reinforced, girls’ education suffers, and women’s ability to diversify their livelihoods (and therefore their capacity to access income-generating jobs) is diminished.

The report notes examples from other sources, including this:

An Oxfam Report (March 2005) on the impact of the 2004 Asia Tsunami on women raised alarms about gender imbalances since the majority of those killed and among those least able to recover were women. In Aceh, for example, more than 75 percent of those who died were women, resulting in a male-female ratio of 3:1 among the survivors. As so many mothers died, there have been major consequences with respect to infant mortality, early marriage of girls, neglect of girls’ education, sexual assault, trafficking in women and prostitution. These woes, however, are largely neglected in the media coverage.

And this:

In a study executed on behalf of ACTIONAID in 1993-1994 in the Himalayan region of Nepal, it became clear that environmental degradation has compounded stress within households and pressure on scarce resources. This meant that the pressure on children, particularly girl children, to do more work and at an earlier age was increasing. Girls do the hardiest work, have the least say and the fewest education options. Programmes that concentrate only on sending more girls to school were failing as the environmental and social conditions of the families deteriorated.


Amazing what a 5 second google search will teach you.

fandomsandfeminism:

xxtopamaxx:

Wtf?! How the hell does that work?! Dumb bitch

Did you consider googleing this to see what she was referring to? Because I wasn’t sure either, but sure enough, a quick google search found: 

Clime Change will affect women more severly than men

The report, Gender and Climate Change(available here as a PDF), concludes that women are more severely affected by climate change and natural disasters because of their social roles and because of discrimination and poverty. To make matters worse, they’re also underrepresented in decision-making about climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and, most critically, discussions and decisions about adaptation and mitigation. From the report:

For example, the 20,000 people who died in France during the extreme heat wave in Europe in 2003 included significantly more elderly women than men. In natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, both in developing and in developed countries, it is primarily the poor who have suffered—and all over the world, the majority of the poor are women, who at all levels earn less than men. In developing countries, women living in poverty bear a disproportionate burden of climate change consequences. Because of women’s marginalized status and dependence on local natural resources, their domestic burdens are increased, including additional work to fetch water, or to collect fuel and fodder. In some areas, climate change generates resource shortages and unreliable job markets, which lead to increased male-out migration and more women left behind with additional agricultural and households duties. Poor women’s lack of access to and control over natural resources, technologies and credit mean that they have fewer resources to cope with seasonal and episodic weather and natural disasters. Consequently traditional roles are reinforced, girls’ education suffers, and women’s ability to diversify their livelihoods (and therefore their capacity to access income-generating jobs) is diminished.

The report notes examples from other sources, including this:

An Oxfam Report (March 2005) on the impact of the 2004 Asia Tsunami on women raised alarms about gender imbalances since the majority of those killed and among those least able to recover were women. In Aceh, for example, more than 75 percent of those who died were women, resulting in a male-female ratio of 3:1 among the survivors. As so many mothers died, there have been major consequences with respect to infant mortality, early marriage of girls, neglect of girls’ education, sexual assault, trafficking in women and prostitution. These woes, however, are largely neglected in the media coverage.

And this:

In a study executed on behalf of ACTIONAID in 1993-1994 in the Himalayan region of Nepal, it became clear that environmental degradation has compounded stress within households and pressure on scarce resources. This meant that the pressure on children, particularly girl children, to do more work and at an earlier age was increasing. Girls do the hardiest work, have the least say and the fewest education options. Programmes that concentrate only on sending more girls to school were failing as the environmental and social conditions of the families deteriorated.

Amazing what a 5 second google search will teach you.

(via misandry-mermaid)